Home » Features » Explore Shrewsbury's unusual pubs and bars

Explore Shrewsbury's unusual pubs and bars

With over 40 pubs and bars within the loop of the Severn, you're spoilt for choice when visiting Shrewsbury! We've pulled together a guide to some of Shrewsbury's more unusual pubs and bars; from most haunted to the king of craft and home of organic - you're sure to find your new favourite here!

Oldest Pub - Built in 1404, The Kings Head is a proud, double-jettied, timber-framed building. One of Shrewsbury's oldest public houses, it in fact began life as a merchant's house. During renovations in the 1980s, a painting was discovered upon the brickwork of the chimney stack in the main room. The painting is aged and incomplete, so it is not clear if the painting is one large or three smaller scenes; however, the middle section appears to depict The Last Supper. Dated to the 14th century and pre-Reformation, medieval wall paintings like this are incredibly rare. In a first floor bedroom, they also discovered a priest's hole, inside which was found a bundle of sulphur matches, a scissor-shaped candle trimmer and snuffer, and several clay pipes.

Most Haunted - One of Shrewsbury's best known pubs, The Nag's Head dates back to the 16th century. Over the years the pub has garnered a ghostly reputation, due in part by the macabre painting hidden away in a cupboard, in an upstairs bedroom. The subject matter is undecided, some say it's a man with a trident, others believe Neptune, while others still believe it to be the Devil himself. What is undeniable is the folklore that has risen up around the painting. It is believed to be haunted and that whoever lays their eyes on it is driven to suicide. Three of The Nag's Heads' patrons have met an untimely death; a coachman who threw himself to be crushed to death beneath a horse and carriage, a young woman who jumped from one of the building's windows and a solider heading home from WWI who shot himself.

Quirkiest Pub - The Loggerheads is a wonderfully unspoiled, historic pub. Believed to have a served as a public house since the late 18th century, inside you can find original flagstone flooring and wood panelling. The interior is split into smaller rooms and snugs that retain their historic names, including The Gentlemen's Bar and Poet's Corner.

King of Craft - Shrewsbury's only taproom, Tap and Can, is a haven for beer aficionados! Here you'll find a broad selection of real ales, craft beers and ciders, and a range of bottles and cans available to drink in or take away.

Your Favourite - Voted number 1 within the loop of the Severn on TripAdvisor, The Loopy Shrew is popular with residents and visitors alike! Whether it’s to have a breakfast meeting, quick coffee and cake, after-work drinks or to indulge in an evening of fine wines and great food, the team are on hand to help all customers feel at home.

First Non-Smoking - An attractive 16th century timber framed building, The Three Fishes sits upon the cobbles of Fish Street, overlooked by the nearby St Alkmund's Church. In 1994, The Three Fishes made the news when the landlord at the time, John Sims, declared the pub to be non-smoking - one of the first pubs in the country to implement an outright ban. Sims felt passionately about the cause as his father had died of lung cancer.

Home of Organic - Located on Shrewsbury's Castle Gates, Glouglou is a wine bar and shop that's passionate about natural, organic wines. Each bottle is sourced from producers with strong environmental and ethical policies almost all of which is grown organically, some biodynamically, many entirely natural with nothing added and nothing taken away.

Original Shrewsbury is run on behalf of Shrewsbury BID and its members, it is therefore not a complete representation of all the business operating within Shrewsbury. 
Not all businesses can be included in every feature, however if you believe you should have been included please contact [email protected] 
If you would like your business to be involved with the Original Shrewsbury platform you can read more about voluntary membership here